Clusters & Working Stitches Together

Clusters & Working Stitches Together

 

Clusters, are stitches where two or more stitches are worked together.

They are mainly used as decorative stitches but working stitches together [tog] is also used to decrease the number of stitches in a row or round.

 

Clusters

A cluster is a group of stitches joined closely together at the top and bottom, or sometimes at the top only. Where the stitches are joined top and bottom the pattern will normally have the details in the "Special Stitches" section and may be abbreviated as [cl].
Where the stitches are joined at the top only it will often be refered to as [tog], eg: dc3tog.

To make a "starting" cluster:

Make a standing tr, but omit the last yarn over and pull through two.
Two loops on hook.
Make another two tr, omitting the last yarn over and pull through two.
Four loops on hook.
Yarn over and pull through all four loops, to close the cluster.

A starting or beginning cluster can also be started with ch 3 for tr cluster or ch 2 for dc cluster.

begining cluster

Starting Treble Cluster

 

To make a dc cluster:

When making a dc cluster you will be making half a stitch for each stitch and then yarn over and pull through all loops on hook to complete all of the stitchs at the same time.

Yarn over, put hook through indicated stitch, yarn over and pull through two.
Two loops on hook.
Again, yarn over and pull through two.
Three loops on hook.
Again, yarn over and pull through two.
Four loops on hook.
Yarn over and pull through all four loops to complete the stitch.

col dc cluster col

To make a tr cluster:

When making a tr cluster you will be making two thirds of a stitch for each stitch and then yarn over and pull through all loops on hook to complete all of the stitches at the same time.

Yarn over twice, put hook through indicated stitch, yarn over and pull through two, yarn over and pull through two.
Two loops on hook.
Again, yarn over and pull through two, twice.
Three loops on hook.
Again, yarn over and pull through two, twice.
Four loops on hook.
Yarn over and pull through all four loops to complete the stitch.

trclustercol

As you can see with the clusters they are made into one stitch and there is one stitch at the top, no change in the number of stitches in the row or round.

With the [tog] stitches you can see that there are three stitches at the bottom but only one stitch at the top, thus decreasing by two stitches.

To make a sc2tog:

Hook through indicated stitch and pull up a loop, repeat in next stitch, yarn over and pull through all three loops on hook.
Decrease of one stitch.

 

colsc2tog

To make a dc3tog:

Yarn over, put hook through indicated stitch, yarn over and pull through two.
Two loops on hook.
In next stitch, yarn over and pull through two.
Three loops on hook.
In next stitch, yarn over and pull through two.
Four loops on hook.
Yarn over and pull through all four loops to complete the stitch.
Decrease of two stitches.

dc3togcol

A handy hint....

When working more than one group of stitches together to decrease, fold your work over to avoid stretching the top loops of your stitches, and maintain a much neater look to your work.

hint3

Another handy hint.....

When working large groups of stitches together, as with Catherine Wheel or Starburst stitches, especially if you are working with thicker yarns, using a tunisian hook can make it easier to keep all your stitches on your hook.

hint2

I hope you find this helpful, please don't hesitate to ask any questions and do let me know if there is anything else you would like me to cover in my tutorials.

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0 Responses

  1. […] Repeat from * to* 7 more times, omit last 3 hdc. Join to standing hdc with a sl-st. Stitch Count: 184 hdc, 16 sc2tog. Hint: To learn more about working stitches together go here. […]

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